The Time Between Dog and Wolf

by Christine Adams Beckett

The letters on the printed page
Become indecipherable,
A time the French call
“Le temps entre
Chien et Loup,”
Whereas at dusk,
It is impossible to
Distinguish a dog
From a wolf, a
Domestic friend, or
Potential natural enemy
Who haunted childhood
Fairy tales and dreams.

The late summer breezes
Slow. It is quiet,
The children having
Retreated to eat their
Evening meals, the sun
No longer offering a
Good perspective on their
Bike spokes, basketball nets
Or fishing lines.

The sky darkens and
The horizon seems
A painting, a tableau
Commemorating
The end of a cycle
That is one day.
The cooler air invites us
Out to our lawns
With a drink, making
Meditative exhalations,
Through curlicued smoke
As the last streaks of sunlight turn
Illuminated clouds
To a final grey blue.

The katydid, awakening,
Sounds his mating call,
The first one tentatively
Breaks the silence
Like an uninvited guest,
A killjoy,
Who reminds us all
Of an impending September.

Old wives of New England
Mark the first rushed chirp
Of the ephemeral tettigoniidae
As the last of summer,
The first frost only
Six weeks away;
With a mere year
To replicate itself,
To close the arc of
A short life,
The menacing sound
Reluctantly comes
Irregardless of
Human associations.

In the dark,
We retreat from a full day
When the world is awake and
Quivering with
Work and consciousness.
We curl into worn arm chairs
With books and weary limbs,
Around dining tables
With children, fresh vegetables
And decks of cards,
Into beds with cups of tea,
And music and with any luck, a partner.
We briefly crave
The welcome rest that
Autumn will provide, and
Bring us closer –
More quickly –
To another year,
Through the palest of dawn.