Still Life with Pear

by Christine Adams Beckett

A bartlett pear, held atop the
Touching wrists of a child,
Is a homage, a prayer,
A subject of Van Gogh, more
Than a simple selection of produce.

Brought to the nose,
Molecules dance to the
Back of her tiny throat
In a sweet wave
That whispered:
I am a healer! The strength
Of my seeds will arouse
Even a dying king,
Prostrate on his bed!

Or so goes the legend
Of the Bartlett’s
Fifteenth Century
French origins.

The child declares
It must be saved
Until story hour,
When mother and child
Would tuck themselves
Into one another’s bodies,
And read a selection
Divine enough, simple enough
To illustrate life’s sweetness,
No matter how small.

She lay the ovoid-shaped,
Pinched like maternal hips,
Fruit into a dough bowl
With others, still too
Green to be savored.
She staked her claim and
Gazed at it, golden,
Amber and radiant
Like the sunshine that
Cultivated it.

At four years,
Nowhere near
Ripened herself,
One wonders how
She found the time to understand
The value of delayed gratification,
Drawn-out pleasures,
Or the wisdom to place
Luminosity on a single,
Perfect pear:
Ephemeral, rare,
Tucked brilliantly
Into her monotonous days
Of letters, numbers and
Bird-sized, earthly meals.

1887 -88, Vincent Van Gogh, Still Life with Pears Oil on Canvas Courtesy of Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden

1887 -88, Vincent Van Gogh, Still Life with Pears
Oil on Canvas
Courtesy of Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden