Kinship

by Christine Adams Beckett

Two sisters barely fit
Into the soaking tub anymore.
They lie curled around
One another, like a monochromatic
Human rendition of the
Yin and the yang,
All alabaster and pink,
Slick with soap and
Bath water.

They take their turns, out
Of spatial necessity, rinsing
Their hair, golden made
Dark amber with the water,
Which clings to their heads
Pronouncing the enormity
Of their skulls, the fullness
Of their cheeks. It drips
From curlicued ribbons,
Onto their tiny,
Rounded shoulders.

Imagine, if years had not
Separated their births,
What a sonographic image
Of them would have looked like:
Two new bodies, underdeveloped,
Intertwined, unable to
Support the greatness
Of their heads, the epicenter
Of who they are and
What they will become.