Stoics Shoveling Snow

by Christine Adams Beckett

They emerge from their dwelling-places,
New Englanders, to the public
Colonnade, suburban sidewalks
Clogged and choked by
Township plows. Mounds
Of packed snow, churned up like a wake
Line the streets, shrouding
Helpless cars in drifts and clouds.

Tax payer dollars, purchased plows,
Providing service for the public good,
Ipso facto, is a burden: the personal
Chore of freeing one’s self
From the natural reality
That is the weather, worsened.

They nod to neighbors
Commenting on the beauty,
Bright and peaceful,
In the recaptured sun.
Aware of their public persona,
Shells of themselves,
They bend at the knee
And smoothly, without complaint,
Clear a path to the larger world
Beyond themselves.

Their pajamas, hidden
Under snowmobile suits,
Goose down, soak with
Their efforts. They bear
The logical result of
Precipitation in
Sub-freezing temperatures,
And ignore a nagging,
Lonely voice that is heard, loudly
And echoing off new-fallen,
Silent snow.

They connect with the fire,
Their primordial being and
The warmth of strength,
While the cynic across the street,
Who with his heavy equipment
Curses the long winter,
And claims a seat on
The next flight
To Paradise Island.